extraterrestrial braziliano.
Reblogged from linguisten  237 notes

The loss of human culture is frightening. Nearly all the threatened languages are spoken by indigenous peoples and, along with the languages, the traditional knowledge of these cultures is being forgotten. The names, uses, and preparation of medicines, the methods of farming, fishing and hunting are disappearing, not to mention the vast array of spiritual and religious beliefs and practices which are as diverse and numerous as the languages themselves. By According to a report by researchers Jonathan Loh at the Zoological Society of London and David Harmon, the steep declines in both languages and nature mirror each other. One in four of the world’s 7,000 languages are now threatened with extinction, and linguistic diversity is declining as fast as biodiversity – about 30% since 1970. (via climateadaptation)

si es que piensas hermano que te lo vas a llevar
Te digo: todo lo de esta tierra aquí se va quedar.
Todo lo que aquí hay de bueno está para compartir.
También: para que recordemos que es dar para recibir
Un hombre sabio me dijo: yo soy igual a ti.
ahora ven canta conmigo y cantando se feliz
puede que ya no vuelvas a pasar por aquí.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oXqUnvtVYNcTupynambá Melodie - the first transcription of a native Brazilian melody - Histoire d’un Voyage Faict en la Terre du Brésil, 1578When Jean de Léry (1536–1613) visited Brazil in 1557-1558, as part of a colonizing and missionary expedition sent by Jean Calvin to “Antartic France” (mid-16th century French colony in present-day Rio de Janeiro), he recorded in his travel diary  the First Transcription of a Native Brazilian Melody.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oXqUnvtVYNc
Tupynambá Melodie - the first transcription of a native Brazilian melody - Histoire d’un Voyage Faict en la Terre du Brésil, 1578

When Jean de Léry (1536–1613) visited Brazil in 1557-1558, as part of a colonizing and missionary expedition sent by Jean Calvin to “Antartic France” (mid-16th century French colony in present-day Rio de Janeiro), he recorded in his travel diary  the First Transcription of a Native Brazilian Melody.

la-pitonisa-tropical:

biomorphosis:

The maned wolf is the largest canine species in South America and closely resembles a red fox on stilts because of its long legs. It is neither a wolf, fox, coyote, or dog  but rather a member of its own Chrysocyon genus, making it a truly unique animal. They possess a mane that runs from the back of the head to the shoulders which can be erected to intimidate other animals when displaying aggression or when they feel threatened. 

Unlike other wolves that live in packs, maned wolves do not form or hunt in packs but prefer to live alone.  Maned wolf is considered as the last surviving species of the Pleistocene Extinction, which wiped out all other large canids from the continent.

Aguará Guazú »del Tupi-Guaraní [avañe’ẽ] “aguará guazú”: ‘zorro grande’ // ‘big fox’ in Tupi-Guaraní [avañe’ẽ]«

"…Le debo una canción a lo que supe, A lo que supe y no pudo ser más que silencio. Le debo una canción, una que ocupe, La cantidad de mordaz amor de un juramento. (…) Le debo una canción a las fronteras, A las fronteras humanas, no las del misterio…"